Antikythera Mechanism: Space.com and LiveScience enlightening about The world's first computer — Sol-Legas 3.0

Antikythera Mechanism: Space.com and LiveScience enlightening about The world's first computer

Antikythera Mechanism: Space.com and LiveScience enlightening about The world's first computer

Scientists may have finally made a complete digital model for the Cosmos panel of a 2,000-year-old mechanical device called the Antikythera mechanism that's believed to be the world's first computer.

First discovered in a Roman-era shipwreck by Greek sponge divers in 1900, the fragments of a shoebox-size contraption, once filled with gears and used to predict the movements of heavenly bodies, has both baffled and amazed generations of researchers ever since.

The discovered fragments made up just one-third of a larger device: a highly-sophisticated hand-powered gearbox capable of accurately predicting the motions of the five planets known to the ancient Greeks, as well as the sun, the phases of the moon and the solar and lunar eclipses — displaying them all relative to the timings of ancient events such as the Olympic Games.

Yet despite years of painstaking research and debate, scientists were never able to fully replicate the mechanism that drove the astonishing device, or the calculations used in its design, from the battered and corroded brass fragments discovered in the wreck.

But now researchers at University College London say they have fully recreated the design of the device, from the ancient calculations used to create it, and are now putting together their own contraption to see if their design works.

«Our work reveals the Antikythera Mechanism as a beautiful conception, translated by superb engineering into a device of genius,» the researchers wrote on March 12 in the open-access journal Scientific Reports. «It challenges all our preconceptions about the technological capabilities of the ancient Greeks.»

(by Space.com materials)

Read more here: https://www.space.com/scientists-unlock-cosmos-ant...

Image credit: Tony Freeth/UCL (An 'exploded' view of the Antikythera mechanism.)
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